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    YouTube's new profanity policy causing backlash among creators

    YouTube's recent crackdown on profanity has caused a stir among content creators, with many expressing frustration over the changes and how they were implemented. In November, YouTube announced that it would limit ads or completely demonetize a creator's video if they swear within the first 15 seconds. This policy applies to all videos, including those that were uploaded before the change was made.

    TL:DR:

    • YouTube has implemented new rules for profanity on the platform, which may limit ads or completely demonetize a creator's video if they swear within the first 15 seconds.
    • This rule applies to all videos, including those that were uploaded before the change.
    • YouTubers are feeling the effects on their paychecks and are frustrated with YouTube's communication and inconsistent application of the rules.
    • YouTube's goal is to make videos more "suitable for advertisers", but creators feel like they are being punished for content they made before the rules were put in place.
    • YouTube is now promising to fix the issues, but it remains to be seen how they will address creators' concerns.

    Many creators have reported that YouTube's communication regarding the policy change has been subpar, with some only finding out about the changes after going to Twitter for help. Some have also complained about the lack of clarity in how the rules are being applied, with no clear definition of what YouTube considers to be the "majority of the video."

    YouTube's policy update is intended to ensure that videos are "suitable for advertisers." However, some creators argue that it is not fair to punish older videos that were made before the rules came into place. They also feel that YouTube is expecting them to create videos not only for the standards it has now, but also for those it may implement in the future.

    The platform has also been criticized for its inconsistent approach to profanity, as in April, it updated its rules to allow videos with "the usage of moderate profanity (e.g., shit and bitch) in the first 30 seconds" to be monetizable. This has caused confusion among creators who may have made videos that are no longer allowed to earn ad revenue.

    In response to the backlash, YouTube has promised to fix the situation. However, creators are concerned about the impact the policy change will have on their paychecks and the reach of their videos. They argue that the systems put in place by YouTube to rectify being demonetized are of little help and can initially be vague about why videos were restricted in the first place.

    YouTube's new policy on profanity has caused a divide among creators, with many feeling that it is unfair, unclear, and poorly communicated. While YouTube's intentions may be to ensure that videos are suitable for advertisers, creators are concerned about the impact the policy change will have on their livelihoods and the reach of their content.


    Image Credit: Midjourney

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